HomeGalleryCalendarFAQSearchRegisterMemberlistUsergroupsLog in
Trying out different looks for the forum. Feel free to leave suggestions! - Huklebuc

Share | 
 

 nifty medical stuff, for relie and me and anyone else interested

View previous topic View next topic Go down 
AuthorMessage
lilwing
LoD Mom
avatar

Number of posts : 327
Age : 55
Location : Virginia
Registration date : 2008-01-14

Character sheet
AE Character(Main): lilwing

PostSubject: nifty medical stuff, for relie and me and anyone else interested   Thu May 08, 2008 4:14 am

anyone else who likes it? HUK...could you move the medical stuff from the "fun facts" here to this thread? Me and relie gonna play here and ya'll can read it or ignore it as ya'll like...*grins*
Back to top Go down
View user profile http://www.myspace.com/imjaide
Dragonmaster
LoD Leader


Number of posts : 909
Age : 35
Location : Umeε, Sweden.
Registration date : 2008-01-16

Character sheet
AE Character(Main): Dragonmaster

PostSubject: Re: nifty medical stuff, for relie and me and anyone else interested   Thu May 08, 2008 12:03 pm

Here you go Lilwing. Smile

lilwing wrote:
Okay, not necessarily FUN facts...but, to me, it is interesting stuff....now ya'll know what makes my mind jump...*grins* Just a bit of light reading and I will understand if Relie is the only other person who finds it interesting...*smiles*

7 Deadliest Diseases in History

Quality Health News

A plague that wipes out 25 million people in three years. A disease that kills its victims within hours of the symptoms appearing. A flu that makes its sufferers turn blue before drowning in their own lungs.
It sounds like the stuff of science-fiction movies, but for centuries, these horrid diseases were very real (in fact, some of them could still post a threat today). What are they? Read on as we uncover the seven deadliest diseases in history.

1. Smallpox. By some accounts, smallpox is considered to have killed more people than any other infectious disease. However, thanks to the discovery of the smallpox vaccine, the last known naturally contracted case of the disease was in 1977, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). During its deadliest years, this highly contagious disease killed as many of 30 percent of people who contracted it. Those who survived were often blinded or marked with deep scars. Despite its eradication, smallpox may still pose a threat today, if released as a biological weapon.

2. Spanish Flu: In 1918, the so-called Spanish flu struck quickly and catastrophically. The first reports of the illness came from Spain, but it affected countries around the globe. Some experts put the death toll for that single year as high as 50 million people worldwide. Patients usually took on a bluish hue hours before dying, most likely due to insufficient oxygen. Autopsies revealed that their lungs filled with fluid, causing a drowning-like death. Unlike most types of influenza, which hit children and the elderly hardest, this strain proved deadly even for young adults. Scientists continue to study the Spanish flu to this day, trying to determine exactly what made it so deadly and if it could happen again.

3. The Black Plague. Also known as the black death, this is the plague that kept coming back. At its most deadly, the black plague is thought to have killed 25 million people in Europe--about a third of the population--from 1347 to 1350. The high death toll from the black plague, so named for the black boils it left on the body, is believed to have actually been a result of three similar illnesses: bubonic, septicaemic, and pneumonic plagues. The scourge swept through Europe, killing millions more, on other occasions throughout the next several centuries. However, in no instance did its severity match that of the black death of the mid-14th century.

4. Tuberculosis. The 1905 Nobel Prize in Medicine went to Robert Koch for "his investigations and discoveries" relating to tuberculosis (TB), according to the Nobel Foundation. However, more than 100 years later, TB still kills nearly 2 million people a year and is ranked as the eighth leading cause of death worldwide by the WHO. Symptoms including severe coughing, fever, chills, and fatigue. People with weakened immune systems are especially susceptible to TB; in fact, it's the number-one killer of AIDS patients. In 2007, Andrew Speaker, an Atlanta lawyer and TB patient, made headlines for flying from Europe to Canada, despite being instructed not to do so for fear of infecting fellow passengers.

5. Malaria. Caused by a parasite and transmitted when a person is bitten by an infected mosquito, Malaria remains a serious problem in parts of Africa, although it has been nearly eradicated in the United States. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), more than 1 million people die from it annually, and as many as 500 million people are infected each year. The flulike symptoms appear after 10 to 15 days after being bitten. Malaria can be treated with medication, if caught soon enough.

6. Ebola. This virus is a relatively new deadly disease that has been known to kill up to 90 percent of its victims. It first appeared in 1976, in Sudan and Zaire. It can be transmitted from person to person or by handling materials from an infected animal. Its early symptoms include fever, headache, backache, vomiting, and diarrhea; eventually it can cause inflammation and swelling of nearly all major organs. Most people die from shock, when their bodies stop getting enough blood flow.

7. Cholera. Cases of cholera are rare today, due to advancements in water treatment and sewage systems. However, in the 19th and even early 20th centuries, cholera epidemics struck several times. The disease, which is characterized by watery diarrhea, can kill a healthy person as soon as two to three hours after the onset of symptoms, though it usually takes several days. Although cholera is still present today in parts of the world that have been ravaged by war or famine, it generally doesn't pose a problem when clean water and proper sanitation is available. A vaccine, which lasts for up to six months, is available for people traveling to areas where cholera may be a concern, though some experts question its necessity and effectiveness.

Copyright © 2008 MTS Corp. All rights reserved.

Relie wrote:
Interesting fun facts Mom!

Here's another one for you on TB

Did you know that TB was known as 'Consumption' because the disease 'consumes' those who have it? Also, Doc Holiday died from TB. They use to have special 'sanitoria' for TB patients to go to for care. Basically trying to isolate them from the rest of the public.

TB is one of the things I feared the most while training as a medic. You see, the HIV virus is killed pretty quickly with proper sterilization techniques, and the pathologen that causes HIV dies when the blood or bodily fluids is dry. Hep B unfortunately can be reactivated when the blood is rewet either with water or a cleanser, but again, it's killed pretty easily with proper sterilization and of course, protection.

TB on the can be a silent 'catch'. The person coughing on you may or may not know they have TB, thus increasing your risk of contracting it. And as a medic or any healthcare worker, once you contract it, you can't work with the public anymore. You are considered a hazard yourself. When I was in training and working with the public, we were required to be tested at least 1 time per year. Every 6 months if there was an active case of TB discovered within our county.

As for Malaria.... one of the most effective ways to block that is with DEET. Unfortunately DEET received a bad name and for the longest time, you couldn't find it. It's starting to make a come back because they have found that other products don't seem to work as well... and Lime Disease (caused by deer ticks) and of course West Nile Virus (a type of encephalitis caused by those pesky skeeters also) cases are on the rise. There is a reported 20,000 cases of Lime Disease and 100,000 case of encephalitis to the CDC every year.

In our area, we have seen cases of West Nile encephalitis in the past couple of years. Normally a few cases in the state. There are many people who don't think about items in their yard that collect water that are the perfect skeeter breeding grounds - animal outside water bowls, buckets, kids toys, tires, basically anything that can hold water for an extended period of time that's not treated with chemicals (a pool is treated and the skeeter eggs can't survive in a properly chlorinated poor).


Thanks for sharing Mom! And you're correct.. I did find it an interesting read!

Of course.. I couldn't help but throw my 50 cents in the mix too!
Back to top Go down
View user profile
lilwing
LoD Mom
avatar

Number of posts : 327
Age : 55
Location : Virginia
Registration date : 2008-01-14

Character sheet
AE Character(Main): lilwing

PostSubject: Re: nifty medical stuff, for relie and me and anyone else interested   Thu May 08, 2008 2:33 pm

Woot! Thank you thank you! **hugs you**
Back to top Go down
View user profile http://www.myspace.com/imjaide
Relie
LoD Scout
avatar

Number of posts : 91
Age : 44
Location : Michigan
Registration date : 2008-01-14

Character sheet
AE Character(Main): Relie

PostSubject: Re: nifty medical stuff, for relie and me and anyone else interested   Thu May 08, 2008 11:02 pm

YAY!!!

I feel special now!!

hehehe!
Back to top Go down
View user profile http://www.facebook.com/dhall2371
Guest
Guest



PostSubject: Re: nifty medical stuff, for relie and me and anyone else interested   Fri May 09, 2008 4:21 am

hehe going to be fun reading this stuff Very Happy
Back to top Go down
lilwing
LoD Mom
avatar

Number of posts : 327
Age : 55
Location : Virginia
Registration date : 2008-01-14

Character sheet
AE Character(Main): lilwing

PostSubject: Re: nifty medical stuff, for relie and me and anyone else interested   Fri May 09, 2008 8:50 pm

The 5 Biggest Bacteria Hot Spots
Quality Health News
You may want to think twice about how you store your toothbrush, where you set your purse, and how often you replace your mascara. Research shows that billions of germs could be lurking in these hot spots--and making you and your family sick. Here, uncover top five secret hiding spots for germs, and learn what you can do to keep bacteria at bay.
Time to Come Clean
Hot Spot: Your toothbrush. The dirty truth is that every time you flush the toilet, your toothbrush gets sprayed with bacteria-and there's certainly plenty of these little guys to go around. According to experts, the average toilet bowl contains 3.2 million germs per square inch, and when you flush, these germs are propelled as far as six feet.

The Solution: Keep your toothbrush as far away from the toilet as possible, or hide it away in the medicine cabinet.

Hot Spot: Your kitchen sponge. Numerous studies show that sponges are one of the most contaminated objects in the home and can harbor billions of bacteria. They could even be infested with staphylococcus or salmonella, which can cause symptoms such as vomiting and diarrhea if consumed.

The Solution: According to an article published in The Journal of Environmental Health, dampening your sponge with water and then putting it in the microwave for two minutes will help eliminate the germs that lurk inside the crevices. Some experts are skeptical, though, claiming that it's better to rinse sponges with soap and water and then keep them out of the sink so they can dry out between uses. Either way, it's important that sponges be replaced every few weeks in order to prevent excessive bacteria buildup.

Hot Spot: Your purse. According to researchers at Nelson Laboratories in Salt Lake City, women's purses may carry a host of nasty bacteria including salmonella and E. coli, which can lead to gastrointestinal and eye problems. And here's something you may not want to know: Researchers found evidence of trace fecal contamination on the majority of purses tested.

The Solution: Avoid placing your purse on the floor of a train, bus, car, or public restroom. Also, get in the habit of wiping yours down with antibacterial wipes at the end of each day. If your purse is washable, toss it in the washing machine every couple of weeks on a gentle cycle.

Hot Spot: Your office desk. According to a University of Arizona study, the average office desk contains 20,961 germs per square inch. The worst desktop offenders? Phones, computer keyboards, and mouses, all of which can serve as a petri dish for bacteria and the viruses that cause colds and flu.

The Solution: According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention(CDC), you can help keep desktop germs to a minimum by wiping down the desk with disinfectant and refraining from eating at your desk.

Hot Spot: Your makeup. You might think that tube of lip color is just divine, but there may be more to your makeup than meets the eye. Cosmetics, as well as applicators like sponges and brushes, typically harbor tons of bacteria, which could lead to eye and skin infections.

The Solution: The American Academy of Dermatology recommends replacing powders and eye shadows every two years, foundation and lipstick every year, and mascara every three months. Applicators should also be washed regularly with soap and water.

Copyright © 2008 MTS Corp. All rights reserved.


Last edited by lilwing on Sat May 10, 2008 4:27 am; edited 1 time in total
Back to top Go down
View user profile http://www.myspace.com/imjaide
Guest
Guest



PostSubject: Re: nifty medical stuff, for relie and me and anyone else interested   Sat May 10, 2008 1:13 am

now thats some good facts to know hehe but my tooth brush is next to my sink and i don't use a purse so im good there lol
Back to top Go down
lilwing
LoD Mom
avatar

Number of posts : 327
Age : 55
Location : Virginia
Registration date : 2008-01-14

Character sheet
AE Character(Main): lilwing

PostSubject: Re: nifty medical stuff, for relie and me and anyone else interested   Sat May 10, 2008 4:28 am

if your toothbrush is in your bathroom....its at risk...which sink you talkin bout girlie? *laughs*
Back to top Go down
View user profile http://www.myspace.com/imjaide
Relie
LoD Scout
avatar

Number of posts : 91
Age : 44
Location : Michigan
Registration date : 2008-01-14

Character sheet
AE Character(Main): Relie

PostSubject: Re: nifty medical stuff, for relie and me and anyone else interested   Sat May 10, 2008 9:59 pm

lilwing wrote:
if your toothbrush is in your bathroom....its at risk...which sink you talkin bout girlie? *laughs*

Actually Darlin'....

On the show Mythbusters on Discovery Channel, they proved the toothbrush in the bathroom wrong. They actually had more bacterial on the toothbrush if it was kept by the KITCHEN sink than having it ON the back of the toilet!

As for purses... where the hell am I suppose to put it but on the floor of my vehicle? LMAO!
Back to top Go down
View user profile http://www.facebook.com/dhall2371
Guest
Guest



PostSubject: Re: nifty medical stuff, for relie and me and anyone else interested   Sat May 10, 2008 10:17 pm

ewwwwwwwwwwwwwwww now imma have to change my tooth brush's and move them but ty for the update i don't watch much t.vo i don't keep up on stuff lol so if ya got any ideas on things or hear something i might want to know please put it done laughs always busy run run run
Back to top Go down
lilwing
LoD Mom
avatar

Number of posts : 327
Age : 55
Location : Virginia
Registration date : 2008-01-14

Character sheet
AE Character(Main): lilwing

PostSubject: Re: nifty medical stuff, for relie and me and anyone else interested   Sat May 10, 2008 10:39 pm

if'n it don't fit in my back pocket? I don't take it...no pocketbooks for me...*grin*
Back to top Go down
View user profile http://www.myspace.com/imjaide
lilwing
LoD Mom
avatar

Number of posts : 327
Age : 55
Location : Virginia
Registration date : 2008-01-14

Character sheet
AE Character(Main): lilwing

PostSubject: Re: nifty medical stuff, for relie and me and anyone else interested   Fri Jun 13, 2008 4:23 am

ya'll know I hadda post it, long or not....*laughs*

What is necrotizing fasciitis?
Necrotizing fasciitis is a rare bacterial infection that can destroy skin and the soft tissues beneath it, including fat and the tissue covering the muscles (fascia). Because these tissues often die rapidly, a person with necrotizing fasciitis is sometimes said to be infected with "flesh-eating" bacteria. The most common type of bacteria causing necrotizing fasciitis is Streptococcus pyogenes.
When necrotizing fasciitis occurs in the area of the genitals, it is called Fournier gangrene.
Necrotizing fasciitis is very rare but serious. Around 30% of those who develop necrotizing fasciitis die from the disease.
1 Many people who get necrotizing fasciitis are in good health prior to the infection.
2 Those at increased risk of developing the infection are people who:
• Have a weakened immune system or lack the proper antibodies to fight off the infection.
• Have chronic health problems such as diabetes, cancer, or liver or kidney disease.
• Have cuts, including surgical wounds from operations such as an episiotomy or a hernia repair.
• Recently had chickenpox or other viral infections that cause a rash.
• Use steroid medicines, which can lower the body's resistance to infection.
What causes necrotizing fasciitis?
Necrotizing fasciitis is caused by several kinds of bacteria. The most common cause is infection by a group A streptococcal (GAS) bacterium, most often Streptococcus pyogenes, which also causes other infections such as strep throat and impetigo. Usually the infections caused by these bacteria are mild. But in rare cases the bacteria produce poisons (toxins) that can damage the soft tissue below the skin and cause a more dangerous infection that can spread quickly along the tissue covering the muscle (fascia). The bacteria also can travel through the blood to the lungs and other organs. The disease also may be caused by Vibrio vulnificus. Infection with this bacterium can occur if wounds are exposed to ocean water or contact raw saltwater fish or oysters. Infection also may occur through injuries from handling sea animals such as crabs. These infections are more common in people who have chronic liver diseases such as cirrhosis.
Another type of necrotizing fasciitis may be caused by multiple bacteria found in the intestine. This type most often affects people with diabetes or peripheral arterial disease. Sometimes people who have gunshot injuries, intestinal surgery, or tumors in the lower digestive tract develop necrotizing fasciitis.
A break in the skin allows bacteria to infect the soft tissue. In some cases, infection can also occur at the site of a muscle strain or bruise, even if there is no break in the skin. It may not be obvious where the infection started, because the bacteria may travel through the bloodstream to other parts of the body.
Group A strep bacteria producing the toxins that cause necrotizing fasciitis can be passed from person to person. But a person who gets infected by the bacteria is unlikely to develop a severe infection unless he or she has an open wound, chickenpox, or an impaired immune system.
What are the symptoms?
A person may have pain from an injury that gets better over 24 to 36 hours and then suddenly gets worse. Often the pain is much worse than would be expected from the size of the wound or injury. Other symptoms may include fever, chills, and nausea and vomiting or diarrhea. The skin usually becomes red, swollen, and hot to the touch. If the infection is deep in the tissue, these signs of inflammation may not develop right away.
The symptoms often start suddenly (over a few hours or a day), and the infection may spread rapidly and can quickly become life-threatening. Serious illness and shock can develop in addition to tissue damage. Necrotizing fasciitis can lead to organ failure and, sometimes, death.
How is necrotizing fasciitis diagnosed?
A person with necrotizing fasciitis usually is very sick before he or she sees a doctor. The doctor may suspect necrotizing fasciitis based on how fast the symptoms developed and how quickly the infection is progressing. A sample of the infected tissue may be taken to identify the type of bacteria causing the infection. X-rays, CT scans, or MRI scans may be done to look for injury to the organs or to find out the extent and depth of the infection.
How is it treated?Immediate medical care in a hospital is always necessary. Supportive care for shock, kidney failure, and breathing problems is often needed. Most people will need surgery to stop the infection from spreading. Extensive use of antibiotics is needed to kill the bacteria.
What if I know someone with the disease?
Most people will not get necrotizing fasciitis. You generally do not have to worry about getting the disease, because the bacteria that cause the disease usually do not cause infection unless they enter the body through a cut or other break in the skin.
In very rare cases, the bacteria can be spread from one person to another through close contact such as kissing. People who live or sleep in the same household with an infected person or who have direct contact with the mouth, nose, or pus from a wound of someone with necrotizing fasciitis have a greater risk of becoming infected.
If you have been in close personal contact with someone who develops necrotizing fasciitis, there is a small chance that your doctor may recommend that you take an antibiotic to help reduce your chances of getting an infection.3 If you do develop any symptoms of an infection after being in close contact with someone who has necrotizing fasciitis, see your doctor right away.
To help prevent any kind of infection, wash your hands often, and always keep cuts, scrapes, burns, sores, and bites clean.
Back to top Go down
View user profile http://www.myspace.com/imjaide
Guest
Guest



PostSubject: Re: nifty medical stuff, for relie and me and anyone else interested   Mon Aug 18, 2008 10:30 pm

health risks and hazards - By Mary Kearl

It may surprise you how many different ways you put your health on the line, just by going to work. If you have a desk job, you may be exposing yourself to germs, allergens and toxins. And if yours is in the laboratory, fighting crime, on the road or working with your hands, you may be putting yourself at risk for being the victim of a violent crime or even developing occupational cancer. Plus, no matter what your job, how often you work and who you work with can have major repercussions on your health.
Back to top Go down
Sponsored content




PostSubject: Re: nifty medical stuff, for relie and me and anyone else interested   

Back to top Go down
 
nifty medical stuff, for relie and me and anyone else interested
View previous topic View next topic Back to top 
Page 1 of 1
 Similar topics
-
» Wierd as hell diorama stuff...
» Selling 40k Orks and Gorkamorka stuff
» Pretty Cool Tomb Kings stuff for dirt cheap!!!! BUY IT!!!!
» new dark eldar stuff
» Some stuff about Necrons - new question

Permissions in this forum:You cannot reply to topics in this forum
 :: General :: Discussion-
Jump to: